Showing posts with label American Holiday. Show all posts
Showing posts with label American Holiday. Show all posts

Friday, November 23, 2012

Thanksgiving 2012

 Thanksgiving  celebration is over  for our American friends. Do you only express thanksgiving during  this day or everyday  of your life?  If you have to ask me, I am always trying my best to give thanks  everyday for  many things and happenings that comes my way.

Thanksgiving is one of the biggest celebrations and holidays for  our American  friends.  It has been  an annual tradition since  1863. President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed a national day of "Thanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the Heavens", to be celebrated on Thursday. Now it is celebrated every fourth Thursday of the months of November.

I had a wonderful time celebrating  Thanksgiving day with friends yesterday. At lunch time, one of my friends invited me to go with them in the US  Base near our area.  In their Dining Facility or DiFac, a lot of foods were served to celebrate Thanksgiving Day.

I also attended two parties of my friends last night. I am grateful for meeting wonderful people around. Thank you for your friendship and for letting me partake in your Thanksgiving banquet.

Deserts served at the Dining  Facility  at the US Base near our area.

Friday, July 3, 2009

Happy 4th of July

I would like to take this opportunity to greet and wish all American people a joyous and safe celebration of this very memorable day, the celebration of Independence Day! God bless you all and America!

“Let every nation know, whether it wishes us well or ill, we shall pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend, oppose any foe, to assure the survival and success of liberty.”
John Fitzgerald Kennedy

Monday, May 25, 2009

Memorial Day Celebration for Americans

Special greetings to all Americans especially to all American friends from Hohenfels U.S. Base here in Germany in the celebration of Memorial day! I wish you all a safe and enjoyable holiday!

Memorial Day is a United States federal holiday observed on the last Monday of May (May 25 in 2009). Formerly known as Decoration Day, it commemorates U.S. men and women who died while in the military service. First enacted to honor Union soldiers of the American Civil War (it is celebrated near the day of reunification after the civil war), it was expanded after World War I to include American casualties of any war or military action.

HISTORY OF MEMORIAL DAY

Following the end of the Civil War, many communities set aside a day to mark the end of the war or as a memorial to those who had died. Some of the places creating an early memorial day include Sharpsburg, Maryland, located near Antietam Battlefield; Charleston, South Carolina; Boalsburg, Pennsylvania; Petersburg, Virginia; Carbondale, Illinois; Columbus, Mississippi; many communities in Vermont; and some two dozen other cities and towns. These observances coalesced around Decoration Day, honoring the Union dead, and the several Confederate Memorial Days.

According to Professor David Blight of the Yale University History Department, the first memorial day was observed on May 1, 1865 by liberated slaves at the Washington Race Course (today the location of Hampton Park) in Charleston, South Carolina. The site had been used as a temporary Confederate prison camp as well as a mass grave for Union soldiers who died in captivity. The freed slaves disinterred the dead Union soldiers from the mass grave to be inhumed properly reposed with individual graves, built a fence around the graveyard with an entry arch, declaring it a Union graveyard. On May 30, 1868, the freed slaves returned to the graveyard with flowers they had picked from the countryside and decorated the individual gravesites, thereby creating the first Decoration Day. Thousands of freed blacks and Union soldiers paraded from the area, followed by much patriotic singing and a picnic.[4]

The official birthplace of Memorial Day is Waterloo, New York. The village was credited with being the place of origin because it observed the day on May 5, 1866, and each year thereafter. The friendship between General John Murray, a distinguished citizen of Waterloo, and General John A. Logan, who helped bring attention to the event nationwide, likely was a factor in the holiday's growth.

Logan had been the principal speaker in a citywide memorial observation on April 29, 1866, at a cemetery in Carbondale, Illinois, an event that likely gave him the idea to make it a national holiday. On May 5, 1868, in his capacity as commander-in-chief of the Grand Army of the Republic, a veterans' organization, Logan issued a proclamation that "Decoration Day" be observed nationwide[5]. It was observed for the first time on May 30 of the same year; the date was chosen because it was not the anniversary of a battle. The tombs of fallen Union soldiers were decorated in remembrance.

Many of the states of the U.S. South refused to celebrate Decoration Day, due to lingering hostility towards the Union Army and also because there were relatively few veterans of the Union Army who were buried in the South. A notable exception was Columbus, Mississippi, which on April 25, 1866 at its Decoration Day commemorated both the Union and Confederate casualties buried in its cemetery.

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